Sunday, March 13, 2016

Farm Boy To Superstar - Big Bill Broonzy, King of Swing Blues Guitar

Big Bill Broonzy's career began in the nineteen twenties when he played country blues to mostly black people. Through the ‘thirties and ‘40s he skillfully navigated an effective evolution in technique to a much more urban blues guitar picking sound experience fashionable with white spectators.

In the nineteen fifties a return to his old style folk-blues origins made him one of the finest personalities of the emerging American folk blues entertainment resurgence and a? worldwide artist.

His long and various career marks him as one of the key figures in the proliferation of blues guitar music in the 20th century just about any blues guitar instruction should always, always include music from Big Bill.

Broonzy licensed greater than three-hundred tunes in the course of his lifetime, with the inclusion of both variations of old style folk songs and original blues tunes. As a blues writer, he was one-of-a-kind in that his compositions symbolized the many vantage points of his country-to-metropolitan realities.



Born William Lee Conley Broonzy, "Big Bill" was one of Frank Broonzy and Mittie Belcher's seventeen sons and daughters. His birth site and date are contested.

The Mississippi Blues Commission explains that whereas he declared birth in Bolivar County, state of Mississippi, Big Bill was in fact born in Lake Dick, Arkansas.


Broonzy claimed he was born in eighteen ninety three and numerous sources state that year, but just after his demise his twin sister produced a birth certificate presenting it as 1898, the actually accepted date.

Soon after his delivery the family moved to Pine Bluff, Arkansas, where Broonzy spent his youth. He began playing music from a young age.

At the age of 10 he made himself a fiddle by using an old cigar box and figured out how to perform gospel songs and folk songs from his mother's brother, Jerry Belcher. He and a pal by the name of Louis Carter, who played a do-it-yourself guitar, started off playing at communal and religious functions.

Broonzy's own inspiration included the folk music, spirituals, work songs, honky tonk music, hokum and country blues he heard when he was young, and the techniques of his fellow musicians, such as Blind Blake, Jimmy Rogers, Son House, and Blind Lemon Jefferson. Big bill incorporated all these components into his own form of the blues that suggested the post-war Chicago blues sound, later refined and made popular by artists that include Willie Dixon and Muddy Waters.

Although was a creator of the Chicago blues style and had employed electric equipment as early as nineteen forty two, Broonzy's new, white followers wished to experience him performing his earliest songs accompanied just by his own traditional acoustic guitar, seeing as how this was viewed as to be more "honest".

A substantial part of his first ARC/CBS records were reissued in anthology compilations by CBS-Sony, and other earlier songs have been collected on blues reissue music labels, as have his later European and Chicago songs of the nineteen fifties.



In 1980, he was inducted into the first class of the Blues Hall of Fame along with twenty more of the globe's greatest blues superstars. In two-thousand and seven, he was inducted into the first class of the Gennett Records Walk of Fame together with eleven more blues greats such as Louis ArmstrongJelly Roll Morton.

Broonzy as an acoustic guitar player, inspired Muddy Waters.

Acoustic Blues Guitar a la Big Bill Broonzy

Big Bill Broonzy's career began in the nineteen twenties when he performed country blues to mostly black audiences. Through the ‘30s and ‘40s he successfully navigated an effective evolution in technique to a much more metropolitan blues guitar picking sound experience popular with white listeners.

In the fifties a return to his old-fashioned folk-blues origins made him undoubtedly the very best figures of the up-and-coming American folk blues music revival and a truly international artist.

His very long and diverse experience marks him as one of the key figures in the formation of blues guitar entertainment in the twentieth century any acoustic blues guitar lessons should certainly always incorporate songs from Big Bill.



Broonzy copyrighted in excess of 300 songs throughout his whole life, including both adaptations of traditional folk songs and unique blues songs. As a blues writer, he was exceptional in that his creations mirrored the numerous points of view of his rural-to-metropolitan experiences.

Born William Lee Conley Broonzy, Big Bill Broonzy was one of Mittie Belcher & Frank Broonzy's 17 offspring. His birth site and time are disputed.

The Mississippi Blues Commission states that whereas he claimed delivery in Bolivar County, Mississippi, Broonzy was in fact born in Lake Dick, Arkansas state.

Big bill claimed he was born in eighteen ninety three and many experts state that year, but after his death his twin sister released a certificate of birth giving it as 1898, the actually accepted date.



In a short time after his delivery the family unit moved to Pine Bluff, Arkansas, where Broonzy spent his younger years. He got under way playing music at an early age.

At the age of 10 (ten) he made himself a fiddle by using an empty cigar box and figured out how to perform gospel songs and traditional music from his uncle, Jerry Belcher. He and a friend called Louis Carter, who played a do-it-yourself guitar, started off performing at communal and church functions.

Big Bill's own influences could be found in the folk music, gospel songs, field hollers, ragtime music, tin pan alley and country blues he listened to when he was young, and the styles of his contemporaries, such as Blind Blake, Jimmy Rogers, Blind Lemon Jefferson & Son House. Big bill incorporated all these influences into his personal form of the blues that suggested the post-war Chicago blues sound, later perfected and made popular by performers that include Muddy Waters and Willie Dixon.

While he had been a pioneer of the Chicago blues style and had also used electric equipment as soon as nineteen forty two, his newish, white followers wanted to experience him performing his earliest songs complemented just by his own acoustic guitar, since this was viewed as to be more "authentic".

A sizable percentage of his first ARC/CBS recordings were released again in bigger compilations by CBS-Sony, and additional earlier songs have been collected on blues reissue labels, as have his later European and Chicago records of the 1950s.

In nineteen eighty, he was inducted into the first class of the Blues Hall of Fame alongside with 20 more of the world's greatest blues superstars. In 2007, he was awarded top class of the Gennett Records Walk of Fame along with 11 more musical masters such as Louis Armstrong and Jelly Roll Morton.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

How to play blues guitar - Lightnin' Hopkins



 

FREE Blues Guitar Lessons

Lightnin's guitar style could be quite basic or quite complex, but it was never out of place, or awkward. He used the damped bass style of thumb picking, in the am way as Mance Lipscomb, and master like Broonzy, more often than not preferring to play in E.

For ‘Baby Please Don’t Go’ the tune picked on the higher strings roughly mirrors the vocal line, sometimes not a very bright idea, but of course Lightnin' s shows how it's done! Hopkins' guitar guitar was usually tuned down a step or two, probably to suit his low voice, and maybe to help bend those strings around.

A throbbing bass line drives the music and the results are almost supernatural. A master playing moderate to slow blues songs in E or A, he could show his complete control of his thumb action by creating syncopation while singing along at the same time!. (Check out 'Mojo Hand' and try it out yourself - you need good chops!)

The best tip for playing the Hopkins way is go nice and steady, all the while trying to make it sound 'real'. When we think about acoustic blues guitar, its very often music from the Mississippi played in E, the high trebles notes underscored by the driving bass line of that monotonic thumb stroke.

Of course, we can make blues as complex as it can be, but it's true that the most attractive and effective music is frequently simple – it’s the approach and feeling that separates them. An expert such as Texas blues man Lightnin Hopkins, could of course play complicated arrangements, but was best known for making music with an incredible deep and bluesy sound.

 When beginning to look around for those ideal acoustic blues guitar lessons, many folks use the omnipresent 'G', and Google it, as they say. Increasingly more searches for just about anything you could imagine are carried out on Youtube - as a matter of fact it's the 2nd most used search engine after Google itself. Similar to Google, the amount of results found for a term such as 'acoustic' is formidable - how do you pick the tuition that suits you, and how to play blues guitar in the authentic style?

Youtube guitar videos feature all kinds of techniques and skill levels, both paid and for free. Blues guitar tabs of course are the basis of the most effective guitar lessons. It doesn't have to be that complex in the least, with only simple indications of finger movements and blues chord progressions. Many blues tabs have too much complexity, attempting to encapsulate the overall style of the old blues playing, a task not really plausible!

This directs us to the second attribute of great blues guitar courses - the instructor has to be able to play the guitar very well (and the tablature should show exactly what he is demonstrating.) Guitar tab itself isn't enough to translate that delicate pause, or the monotonic thumb strike that hits off-beat when required to complement the song style.

Sure, the tab can indicate the fact that one movement should be damped with the heel of the picking hand, but can't indicate that action itself doesn't continue, but changes in sound as the pressure of the hand in contact with the guitar strings is constantly being varied according to the flow of the music. It's best not to rush when searching for instruction, of any kind.

The Orientals say 'a year or two spent doing little else but finding the right teacher is very well spent'. This is a good observation. You don't need to take a year in your search, but choose with care and take no notice of the hype. Don't expect to improve in two weeks, take it easy, don't push yourself too hard and above all, enjoy the ride and the music.

Looking on the world wide web for guitar tuition in video format can be a time consuming activity, especially for the new student with hardly any experience. What are some of the things to look for in the most effective packages on offer? As you could imagine, we can identify desirable features that could assist in choosing the right instructor.

Lessons should be painless To Follow

Although it just about stands without saying, any lesson for whatever subject should progress in a logical way and be simple to absorb. First steps need to be properly described, and grow into further tuition. Of course music notation has it's place, but the new guitar player is basically impatient to start the learning process - he just wants to play some guitar! This should be the primary step, presenting the fundamental things that can be put into practice right away. When it comes down to it, a deep understanding of the buidling blocks will give huge advantages later on in the instruction.